More Buildings of King’s Lynn

A follow up to my post “Buildings of Lynn”, highlighting some of the architecture that results from nine hundred years of history.

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INTRODUCTION

Just over a week ago I put up a post called “Buildings of King’s Lynn” in response to a very nice comment that Faraday’s Candle had posted on my “About Aspiblog” page. That post was very well received, so I now have this follow-up. 

NINE CENTURIES OF HISTORY

These buildings span most of the history of this town. The first two buildings you will see are visible from right outside my door.

CLIFTON HOUSE TOWER

More or less due west of my own “compact” flat, this tower is instantly recognizable.

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THE GRANARIES

Located on the Purfleet side of Baker Lane car park, and one of the tallest buildings in the town.

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THE GUILDHALL

The second most iconic building in King’s Lynn. The checkerboard frontage is unique, although a couple of other buildings in the town have small bits of the same in their walls and there is one church in Norwich that is not entirely dissimilar.

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GREYFRIARS TOWER

The last remnant of the Franciscan Friary, where at one time Nicholas of Lynn, who certainly sailed as far as Iceland and may have reached the American Coast over a century before Columbus, was resident. 

BANK LANE ARCHES

Another remnant, in between Greyfriars and the Library.

THE LIBRARY

An amazing and important building. This construction in brick and carr provides a vital service to the residents of our town.

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HAYES AND STORR

A solicitor’s office in a very handsome building that happens to be almost directly opposite the library.

THE METHODIST CHAPEL

Right next door to Hayes and Storr.

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THE REMAINS OF ST JAMES’ CHAPEL

One wall section is all that now remains of this chapel, which was also a workhouse in the Victorian age.

THE RED MOUNT CHAPEL

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THE CHURCH OF ST JOHN THE EVANGELIST

This church sits right at the town end of St John’s Walk.

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KING’S LYNN TRAIN STATION

This station, which opened in the 1850s, has recently been restored. It is very close to the centre of the town, and there is the option of a scenic route – follow the footpath down past the church of St John the Evangelist, then diagonally across The Walks to the library, down Millfleet to the river front, along the river front as far as the Purfleet and approach the Tuesday Market Place by way of King Street, thereby circumventing the Vancouver Quarter entirely.

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A SECTION OF OLD TOWN WALL

Very little of King’s Lynn’s old town wall survives, but close to Morrisons and the Primary School this section can be seen.

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HIGHGATE METHODIST CHAPEL

Much smaller than the main Methodist chapel on London Road, this building is located just off Littleport Street, still very close to the town centre.

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AN OLD BUNKER?

I cannot think what else this building which sits next to a small river, just off Littleport Street, could be.

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THE LYNN MUSEUM

Admission to this museum, which adjoins the bus station, is free. 

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THE NEW BUS STATION BUILDING

Following extensive redevelopment work (visit this post for more pictures) the new bus station opened in June of last year. This is the building that accompanied the external developments.

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THE MAJESTIC CINEMA

There have been plans to extend this cinema for some time, but for the moment it remains the same as ever.

THE LYNN RESTAURANT

While both the quality and the prices at this restaurant are very acceptable, it is the restoration work that has been done to the building above it that chiefly interests me.

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ST NICHOLAS CHAPEL

This chapel has recently been repaired and restored, and the results of all this work are spectacular.

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There has been a chapel on this site since 1146

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Timeline
This image shows all four large cushions that comprise the timeline – it is followed by eight individual images that show close ups of parts of the cushions.

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The organ – dates from 1899

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THREE BUILDINGS FROM THE TUESDAY MARKET PLACE

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This building houses the West Nordolk Disability Service among others.
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Not to be confused with the establishment in Norwich where James and Sons hold some of their auctions, this is The Maids Head, King’s Lynn
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The Dukes Head, where the Positive Autism Awareness Conference will be taking place on April 15th. This photo was constrained by the presence of the Mart. After a fortnight in Lynn, the Mart splits in to two to go to various other places around the country – but it is only in Lynn that you get to see everything.

CODA: KING’S LYNN’S NEWEST CONSTRUCTION

A new wind turbine has just been built near the Queen Elizabeth Hospital. It was built very rapidly – there was no sign of anything there on Tuesday, by Thursday morning the tower was in place, and by Friday morning it was complete (my bus travels this way on work mornings). Here are a couple of pictures, taken through the window of the bus on Friday…

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Author: Thomas

I am branch secretary of NAS West Norfolk and #actuallyautistic (diagnosed 10 years ago at the comparatively advanced age of 31). I am a keen photographer, so that most of my own posts contain photos. I am a keen cricket fan and often write about that subject. I also focus a lot on politics and on nature.

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