Heritage Open Day: Post Lunch

The conclusion of my series about Heritage Open Day.

INTRODUCTION

This post completes my account of this year’s Heritage Open Day in King’s Lynn.

A HOUSE, A CLUB AND A FERRY

On way out for my afternoon’s explorations I poked my head round the door of the Rathskellar, but decided not to go in. Queues and crowds notwithstanding I decided that my first port of call of the afternoon would be…

CLIFTON HOUSE

This house is the residence of the current head of English Heritage, and featured rooms open to the public on five different levels, and viewing area on yet a sixth (basement, ground floor, the four intermediate floors of the tower and the roof of the tower). The first part of the building that was opened up featured the cellar, the kitchen and a couple of rooms which could be viewed but not entered. I started by going down to the…

CELLAR

When the house was first built the cellar had been accessible direct from the river (which is now about 50 yards west of the house), and a system of ropes and pulleys was used to offload cargo…

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The first three pictures were taken en route to the cellar.

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Note the vaulted ceiling of the cellar.
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Three iron rings through which thick ropes could run enabled cargo to winched from boats into the cellar. I am not certain if all three are visible in this picture, but I tried to show them all.

After the cellar, it was time for the rest of that part of the building, and on towards the tower by way of…

THE KITCHEN

There were some very interesting things to be seen even though this had the feeling of being merely on the way to somewhere else, because of course what everyone was really interested in seeing was the tower.

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These canons were in a reception area just outside the kitchen.
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The remaining four photographs were all taken in the kitchen.

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Apart from one last major queue because of limitations on the number of people being allowed in there at any one time (for obvious safety reasons) it was now time to venture the…

TOWER

There were interesting things to see on each level of the tower…

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These antique maps and the model of the house were on the first floor of the tower.

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One floor up was a room set up for a Jacobean supper.

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This room was a further floor up

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The ‘Prospect Room’ is one floor below the roof.

The views from the roof were amazing. Conscious of the number of other people who were waiting to savour the views I restricted myself to a few minutes taking the view from all angles, before heading back down.

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Looking towards The Wash
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The Lower Purfleet from above

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The view focussing between St Nicholas Chapel and the docks.

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My humble abode viewed from the top of the Clifton House Tower.

Leaving Clifton House I headed for Ferry Lane, where I paid a call at the premises of

THE OUSE AMATEUR SAILING CLUB

This establishment, which has about 5o sailing members and somewhere around 500 ‘social’ members had opened its Ferry Bar to the public for the day. I consumed a pint of a splendid beer brewed in Lowestoft (just into Suffolk, but possibly close enough to count as local, especially as the other featured brewery is based in Southwold, a little further away). Having purchased my drink I took some photos inside…

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I then went outside on to the balcony overlooking the Great Ouse, and took some photographs from this great vantage point…

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It was at this point that my attention was caught by something downriver, which turned out to be…

THE ARRIVAL OF A FISHING BOAT

Given the role that fishing, and indeed the sea as a whole has played in the history of our town this was a particular splendid sight…

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The first glimpse.

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Turning into the docks and therefore presenting a side-on view.

After finishing my pint I headed for the

FERRY

I finished my day by taking the special ‘Heritage Open Day’ trip on the ferry, which involves a small amount of travel along the river as well as across it. This was my first trip on the new ferries, which are equipped with caterpillar tracks for crossing the exposed mud at low tide. The King’s Lynn Ferry has been in operation for over 800 years.

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The other historic bus (my second post in the series featured the one put on by Towler’s), this one a routemaster.

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Heritage Open Day: Towards Lunch

A continuation oof my personal Heritage Open Day 2016 story which takes it up to lunch.

INTRODUCTION

This is my second post about Heritage Open Day 2016. There will be one more covering my post lunch activities.

THE ATTRACTIONS

On leaving the London Road Methodist Chapel I walked through the parkland and past the train station to the edge of the bus station and the..

LYNN MUSEUM

I took advantage of the fact that it being Heritage Open Day admission was free to have a look round this establishment. The trip round the museum starts with…

SEAHENGE

This is a circle of standing timbers revealed by a particularly low tide (the North Sea coast has been progressively moving west since the end of the last period of glaciation some 10,000 years ago,  and a lot of land from even historic times is now below the surface, including the well known fishing grounds now called Dogger Bank) and ever since taking its place in the museum has been the prime exhibit…

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This is one of two historic buses doing duty on the day, of interest because Towler’s are local, being based near Wisbech.

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There was too much reflection from this side!

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These last two pics are of a speculative model of Seahenge in it’s original surroundings.

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The rest of the museum, although it plays second fiddle to Seahenge is by no means devoid of interest either…

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King’s Lynn circa 1967
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My part of Lynn, circa 1967
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This sort of poster could do with being pressed back into service!

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ichthyosaur
With apologies for the reflections, about which I could do nothing. This was a marine reptile and a contemporary of some dinosaurs but not a dinosaur itself.

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After this museum I got an inside look at something I had witnessed being worked on from my own humble abode…

NEW BUILD ON BAKER LANE

This owes its presence on the Heritage Open Day roster to the fact that it is in a conservation area and therefore obliged to be in keeping with what is already there. The stairs by means of which my flat is accessed are directly across Baker Lane car park from this development. I was reasonably impressed by what I saw…

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I next paid a brief call at the building on Queen Street (Baker Lane is a side street off Queen Street) where the Civic Society had set up shop, where my eye was caught by this tapestry map of Norfolk…

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I saw three more places before breaking off for lunch…

ALMSHOUSES, A COLLEGE AND A SECRET GARDEN

The Victorian almshouses, which like the Baker Lane development are visible from my flat, allowed admission to the upstairs of the front of the building and to a courtyard..

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The Great Hall at Thoresby College has something in common with Headingley cricket ground – looking up is better than looking down!

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This is why I recommend that visitors to the great hall at Thoresby College look up!
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This A3 sheet shows some of the attractions in and around King’s Lynn

The secret garden mentioned in the header of this section is behind Hampton Court, where my aunt lives. The land-facing wall is an old warehouse frontage which back in the day (14th century) abutted directly on to the river so that cargoes could be offloaded direct into the building. Later, when the river had assumed its current position, about 50 yards west of the old warehouse the site of what is now the garden was a waste dump. There is one original door, which used to provide access to Summerfeld & Thomas.

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LUNCH

My aunt had laid out some food on her kitchen table, for which I was very grateful. It was very good food too.

Heritage Open Day 2016 – Starting the Day

My first post about Heritage Open Day 2016.

INTRODUCTION

It is now a well-established tradition that Heritage Open Day in King’s Lynn takes place on the second Sunday of September. I had already decided that I was going to concentrate this year on places I had not previously seen. You can see what I wrote about Heritage Open Day 2015 (and indeed the text relating to Heritage Open Day 2014 – the pictures have been deleted due to lack of storage space in my media library) by clicking here. Also, since the whole point of Heritage Open Day is usually inaccessible places are opened to the public the outsides of buildings do not feature very much. The series of posts about Heritage Open Day 2017 will be different again as I have volunteered to help out at one of the attractions.

WORKING OUT A PLAN OF CAMPAIGN

The weather on Saturday had been downright bad, so it was with relief that I looked out of my windows to see blue sky and bright sun. Leaving my flat at 9:30 (living in the heart of the town it is almost a case of leaving my flat and instantly being in the action I headed for the Tuesday Market Place where I picked up a brochure about the day, and took a photograph of one of the classic cars…

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Having established that All Saints Church, a small establishment concealed from wider public knowledge by Hillington Square, was not opening up until 11:10 I set off to do other things until it opened (I was determined to see inside it, having photographed the outside a number of time). I was delighted to note that the Jewish Cemetery was open, and took a closer look at this little landmark that I previously viewed only through a locked gate.

THE JEWISH CEMETERY

This is a fascinating little place, and there was lots of information on display. This made an excellent first attraction of the day:

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Information first (pics 1-7), then some general pics)

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Just across the road from the Jewish Cemetery is…

THE PUBLIC LIBRARY

There cannot be many people who are more familiar with the areas of this building that are open to the public on a regular basis than me, but I had not previously seen either the manager’s office or the turret room (home to the Stanley Collection, a gift from the 15th Earl of Derby). Unfortunately I was stopped from taking photographs, so I have no pictures of the latter collection, and only a few from the manager’s office.

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This was one way to make sure your books did not get stolen!

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Passing through The Walks I spotted that the fountain had had some kind of bubble bath added to it…

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My next port of call was South Quay, where there was a…

A ‘PILOTS’ BOAT

The pilots in question are responsible for ensuring that ships dock safely, and in the case of the team on this boat the area includes the Great Ouse from just north of Downham Market to the Wash and also the mouth of the Nene, the river which serves Peterborough. As part of their responsibility they position buoys to indicate dangerous areas (it takes about ten minutes to shift one of these buoys once it is in position because they are anchored into position by one ton blocks of iron. There was one such on display so we could see closer than usual what they look like.

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The Pilots Boat
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A rowing crew approaching the jetty.

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The buoy (two pics thereof)

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Marriott’s, viewed from the ramp down to the jetty, thriving as would be expected.

My next port of call was…

THE GUILDHALL OF ST GEORGE

This was both an opportunity to look closely at a historic landmark and an opportunity to have say in its future. They had three plans on show, and it was the third that I particularly approved of. I filled out the questionnaire that they were using to collect information. This looked like being a real consultation ( as opposed to for example ‘we are building a new road, where would you like it to go?’ or ‘we are building a new runway, which airport would you like to get it?’). Once you have seen the photos below and before reading on, why not see if you can guess which plan I liked best…

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My preferred option of those on show was the third one. I hope that this building’s theatrical connection which stretches back six centuries will be maintained.

Walking through the Vancouver Quarter on my way to the next landmark I was pleased to spot a disused shop being put to good use…

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Finally, it was time to visit…

ALL SAINTS CHURCH

This little church is reckoned to be the oldest in King’s Lynn, with parts of the current building dating back almost a thousand years. On the outside it is an attractive building, on the inside…

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I finish this post with the last religious establishment I was to visit…

LONDON ROAD METHODIST CHAPEL

On the outside this is a smart but unspectacular brick fronted building. The inside of the building is very impressive…

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The view from the centre of the upstairs gallery.

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The organ

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Heritage Open Day 12: Conclusion

Helped by some magnificent weather, King’s Lynn was set off to best advantage on Heritage Open Day. The place was choc-a-bloc with things to do and to see, and with people taking advantage of the opportunity to do so. Although my own peregrinations only occupied three hours or so, by the time you add in the time spent editing photos and creating blog posts and it has occupied my attention for approximately 12 hours.

Obviously, the highlight for me was the fisheries research stuff, but I thoroughly enjoyed everything. I will sign off this series of posts with a photographic highlights package…

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Heritage Open Day 11: 25 King Street

This was my last port of call of the day. King Street runs from the Tuesday Market Place to the Purfleet, after which it becomes Queen Street until it reaches the Saturday Market Place. My flat is between the Purfleet and the Saturday Market Place, which makes King Street a thoroughly logical end point.

Number 25, a solicitor’s practice, features many points of interest, not least various parts of a reproduction Bayeux Tapestry. One more post will conclude this series, and in the meantime enjoy these pictures…

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Would this wood burner generate enough heat for the space? You betcha!
Would this wood burner generate enough heat for the space? You betcha!

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Heritage Open Day 10: 11 King Street

Back in town centre having completed my circuit,a couple of properties on King Street that were open for viewing took my fancy, and this one was the first of them. One of its incarnations has been as an accountancy practice, hence the boardroom you will see.

My next post will feature 25 King Street, a solicitor’s practice with more than a few points of interest, but for now enjoy these photos…

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The patterning of this window intrigued me to the extent that I photographed it and took individual pics of each style of pane.
The patterning of this window intrigued me to the extent that I photographed it and took individual pics of each style of pane.

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Heritage Open Day 10: 11 King Street

Back in town centre having completed my circuit,a couple of properties on King Street that were open for viewing took my fancy, and this one was the first of them. One of its incarnations has been as an accountancy practice, hence the boardroom you will see.

My next post will feature 25 King Street, a solicitor’s practice with more than a few points of interest, but for now enjoy these photos…

Boardroom ??????????

The patterning of this window intrigued me to the extent that I photographed it and took individual pics of each style of pane.
The patterning of this window intrigued me to the extent that I photographed it and took individual pics of each style of pane.

?????????? ?????????? ?????????? Curio Cabinet